Friday, May 9, 2008

Images thanks to Gerardbutler gals

Images of Gerry's NY Apt

































Misc shots



















"Instinct" Magazine Throws Party, Names Gayest Nerd! ...Gerard Butler Walks By

The scene is poolside at The Standard on Sunset. Instinct Magazine is throwing a party, and I'm there celebrating my moment as their May Bachelor. I run into old friends like Bobby Trendy and Jonathan Chang and make some new ones.While all this is happening, Gerard Butler, who is not at the party, but is at The Standard is spotted in the restaurant. Party-goer Roberto Ezzevalli grabs him for photo op, shot by the LA Gay & Lesbian Center's Jim Key.I am bummed I miss this as I will forever be grateful to 300 for all the hot guys that now show up at Comic-Con International dressed up like Spartans!
source http://aman-about-town.blogspot.com/

another image of Gerry from JFX


Does A Body GoodIn: Gerard Butler (source JFX online)


Our photogs spotted Gerard Butler yesterday on the set of The Ugly Truth in Studio City. Gerard made sure he had enough energy for the day’s filming, as he packed in the liquids with coffee and a muscle drink. I think that’s what those things are called. Maybe he needed a pick me up. Gerard will be seen in the next Guy Ritchie movie, RocknRolla. The film’s about London’s criminal underworld and knowing Guy Ritchie’s work, it’ll be packed full of action. Gerard kind of reminds me of Russell Crowe, I don’t know why. Anyway, check out a couple other pics of Gerard below.




A couple of unexpectedly favourable views of Robbie following the UFO programme: (thanks to jlml)

From The Times Online On Tuesday we were privileged to hear Robbie Williams and Jon Ronson Journey to the Other Side, an ambiguous title for a programme in which the troubled pop star (©) described his latest bid for inner peace – the paranormal. Or was the Other Side the people he met along the way, the strange beings he found at a UFO conference in sleazy Laughlin, Nevada? Cruelly, Radio 4 had scheduled it in the 6.30pm drivetime comedy slot, which made one wonder – was it a hoax, with a Robbie soundalike? Paranormal stuff does tend to make you paranoid. But no, Laughlin exists, and two of the people they met there have websites to call their own. One is Dr Roger Leir, a surgeon who says he has extracted 15 items of alien metal from human abductees but had brought none of them to the conference to show off. The night before Robbie and Ronson arrived in Laughlin there had apparently been a fight between two alien beings that had yielded a vial of alien blood that was in Leir’s possession. He denied this, laughing avuncularly. He did, though, have a scale from a 7ft alien that someone had disturbed in their kitchen. Only it might have also been a moth’s wing. The other delegate was Ann Andrews, whose son Jason is an Indigo Child, an alien sent to Earth in human guise. She reminded Robbie of his mum. “You know, you look a lot like Robbie Williams,” she said. She’s a big fan. Robbie being Robbie, while he declared himself totally open to believing everything he was told, he’d brought along someone to be his nominated cynic. He was called Brandon. When Andrews showed photographs she had taken of aliens that were blurred because she had taken them on a disposable camera, Brandon asked why she didn’t buy a better camera. It was easy to laugh, but at the heart there was a touching portrait of a man who has tried it all and is still unfulfilled. “Every time I meet charlatans,” he said. “I think: ‘I thought you knew the truth, but you’re just a nutter’.” He’ll keep searching. We wish him well. From The New Statesman Even a pop star obsessed by UFOs can turn out to be charming and witty The big question of the week was not "Did Ken always look this much like Ethel Merman?" but "Is Robbie Williams properly mental?". Robbie Williams and Jon Ronson Journey to the Other Side (6 May, 6.30pm, Radio 4) arrived sequinned and tinselled with a fanfare of trailers and even a more or less complete transcript in the Guardian, like things to do with Richard Nixon. After reading Ronson's excellent 2001 book Them: Adventures With Extremists, Williams emailed Ronson asking him to find a haunted house where the two of them might spend a night. The plan fell through only when Williams remembered that he had 59 international stadium gigs pencilled on his roster, but he later invited Ronson to come with him to the International UFO Congress in Laughlin, Nevada, instead. Obviously simultaneously concerned for the balance of Williams's mind and holding a tissue up to his mouth to catch the saliva, Ronson took the first flight out to Williams's mansion in LA. Initially things looked promising: Williams had grown an enormous beard. On the downside was the presence of Williams's sane and ungroupie-like girlfriend, Ida. This put paid to any proposed wallow with a Williams long-locked in Ch√Ęteau Marmont scarfing Twinkies. "Why UFOs? Why now?" asked Ronson in his girlish, yearning voice. Williams answered that he'd grown tired of sitting in at night reading the UK tabloids online, and so had turned to studying alien visitations, the proponents of which seemed to him rather more reasonable. At the convention in Nevada there was an air of weariness. The night before, there had been a fight between two reptilian beings outside the lobby, but people were scarcely doing their nut over it. Instead of taking a photograph, someone had actually extracted a scale from one of the creatures and it was being held now in a piece of tissue in a hotel room by a scientist who also specialises in removing implants from the brains of grateful abductees. He sounded a little depressed, considering. The people downstairs in the queue to talk to speakers also came over somewhat muted. It was clear that not nearly enough drugs were being taken around here. I mean, how wired would you have to get to listen to a woman giving a lecture on the subject of her barely human son under the title "Indigo Boy: Raising a Multi-Dimensional Star-Child in a Changing Universe"? "I've been incarnated on this planet," said the woman. "I've been incarnated on many planets." "She reminds me of my mum," said Robbie. Williams seems like a very nice, chatty person, and quite Lenny Bruce-ishly laconic. Being oracular is his natural inclination. He kept up a little running commentary on anything from how much the reptile scale looked like a sliver of chocolate to how warped a memory he has. Ronson piped up now and again to be familiarly pragmatic and tender, but it was very much Robbie's show. He has a talent for making the universe feel profoundly personal. "You look like Robbie Williams," said the mother of the star child during a coffee break. "I am Robbie Williams," he answered back, a little surprised at the fact, and then flew home on his aeroplane to stargaze with Ida, smiling left and right.

A couple of unexpectedly favourable views of Robbie following the UFO programme: (thanks to jlml)

From The Times Online On Tuesday we were privileged to hear Robbie Williams and Jon Ronson Journey to the Other Side, an ambiguous title for a programme in which the troubled pop star (©) described his latest bid for inner peace – the paranormal. Or was the Other Side the people he met along the way, the strange beings he found at a UFO conference in sleazy Laughlin, Nevada? Cruelly, Radio 4 had scheduled it in the 6.30pm drivetime comedy slot, which made one wonder – was it a hoax, with a Robbie soundalike? Paranormal stuff does tend to make you paranoid. But no, Laughlin exists, and two of the people they met there have websites to call their own. One is Dr Roger Leir, a surgeon who says he has extracted 15 items of alien metal from human abductees but had brought none of them to the conference to show off. The night before Robbie and Ronson arrived in Laughlin there had apparently been a fight between two alien beings that had yielded a vial of alien blood that was in Leir’s possession. He denied this, laughing avuncularly. He did, though, have a scale from a 7ft alien that someone had disturbed in their kitchen. Only it might have also been a moth’s wing. The other delegate was Ann Andrews, whose son Jason is an Indigo Child, an alien sent to Earth in human guise. She reminded Robbie of his mum. “You know, you look a lot like Robbie Williams,” she said. She’s a big fan. Robbie being Robbie, while he declared himself totally open to believing everything he was told, he’d brought along someone to be his nominated cynic. He was called Brandon. When Andrews showed photographs she had taken of aliens that were blurred because she had taken them on a disposable camera, Brandon asked why she didn’t buy a better camera. It was easy to laugh, but at the heart there was a touching portrait of a man who has tried it all and is still unfulfilled. “Every time I meet charlatans,” he said. “I think: ‘I thought you knew the truth, but you’re just a nutter’.” He’ll keep searching. We wish him well. From The New Statesman Even a pop star obsessed by UFOs can turn out to be charming and witty The big question of the week was not "Did Ken always look this much like Ethel Merman?" but "Is Robbie Williams properly mental?". Robbie Williams and Jon Ronson Journey to the Other Side (6 May, 6.30pm, Radio 4) arrived sequinned and tinselled with a fanfare of trailers and even a more or less complete transcript in the Guardian, like things to do with Richard Nixon. After reading Ronson's excellent 2001 book Them: Adventures With Extremists, Williams emailed Ronson asking him to find a haunted house where the two of them might spend a night. The plan fell through only when Williams remembered that he had 59 international stadium gigs pencilled on his roster, but he later invited Ronson to come with him to the International UFO Congress in Laughlin, Nevada, instead. Obviously simultaneously concerned for the balance of Williams's mind and holding a tissue up to his mouth to catch the saliva, Ronson took the first flight out to Williams's mansion in LA. Initially things looked promising: Williams had grown an enormous beard. On the downside was the presence of Williams's sane and ungroupie-like girlfriend, Ida. This put paid to any proposed wallow with a Williams long-locked in Ch√Ęteau Marmont scarfing Twinkies. "Why UFOs? Why now?" asked Ronson in his girlish, yearning voice. Williams answered that he'd grown tired of sitting in at night reading the UK tabloids online, and so had turned to studying alien visitations, the proponents of which seemed to him rather more reasonable. At the convention in Nevada there was an air of weariness. The night before, there had been a fight between two reptilian beings outside the lobby, but people were scarcely doing their nut over it. Instead of taking a photograph, someone had actually extracted a scale from one of the creatures and it was being held now in a piece of tissue in a hotel room by a scientist who also specialises in removing implants from the brains of grateful abductees. He sounded a little depressed, considering. The people downstairs in the queue to talk to speakers also came over somewhat muted. It was clear that not nearly enough drugs were being taken around here. I mean, how wired would you have to get to listen to a woman giving a lecture on the subject of her barely human son under the title "Indigo Boy: Raising a Multi-Dimensional Star-Child in a Changing Universe"? "I've been incarnated on this planet," said the woman. "I've been incarnated on many planets." "She reminds me of my mum," said Robbie. Williams seems like a very nice, chatty person, and quite Lenny Bruce-ishly laconic. Being oracular is his natural inclination. He kept up a little running commentary on anything from how much the reptile scale looked like a sliver of chocolate to how warped a memory he has. Ronson piped up now and again to be familiarly pragmatic and tender, but it was very much Robbie's show. He has a talent for making the universe feel profoundly personal. "You look like Robbie Williams," said the mother of the star child during a coffee break. "I am Robbie Williams," he answered back, a little surprised at the fact, and then flew home on his aeroplane to stargaze with Ida, smiling left and right.

Where Is Robbie Williams? (thanks to Geraldine @ rwap)

From MSN.co.uk - there are pics and videos at the link http://entertainment.uk.msn.com/celebrity/PhotoGalleries/article.aspx?cp-documentid=8262776 Where Is Robbie Williams? Robbie Williams has ditched pop stardom for a secluded life scanning the skies for UFOs in Los Angeles. He’s loving aliens instead… It’s been over 18 months since 34-year-old Robbie Williams, serial chart-topper and heartthrob, entertained us. After the release of Rudebox and his record-breaking 59-date Close Encounters world tour, Rob saddled up and galloped into obscurity. Since then, the star has been chilling in America, playing a bit of football, and growing a big beard. But his spare time isn't taken up writing songs for his next pop comeback, it's watching the skies for extra terrestrial activity! What’s going on with Robbie? Music career on hold It’s fair to say that Rudebox wasn’t Robbie’s finest hour. Lots of reviews, and quite a few fans, branded it rubbish. But Robbie’s not the first big star to have a career slump (isn’t that right, Britney?) and he certainly won’t be the last. Now would be the perfect time for Rob to put that record behind him and get working on a new one (ideally without trying to rap this time). But sadly, it’s not as simple as that. Robbie is on an unofficial strike from his record label as a result of some unpopular decisions made by EMI’s new boss, Guy Hands. Radiohead quit the label last year and Kylie Minogue is said to be unhappy too. Another reason for Rob's extended break is exhaustion: “I’ve put out 10 albums in 10 years and it takes its toll,” he said. “I definitely wouldn’t go on a tour that was more than about a month. I’m just not built for it.” And it's not like Robbie need to work to pay the bills – he recently ranked 28th on The Sunday Times’ list of Britain’s top 50 music millionaires, sitting just behind Simon Cowell and the Osbournes. The quiet life Understandably, after having cameras pointed in his face for most of his young adult life, Robbie now enjoys the relative peace and quiet of LA where he’s not very famous at all, which is why, as he explains, he wouldn’t move back to the UK at the moment: “I think situations would probably have to change,” he said. “If I based myself in England it would mean that I don’t sell records anymore. I wouldn’t be in a country that has the tabloids that we do... I’m not famous here. I can go out and do everything I want here, and that’s lovely.” She's the one After years of jumping into and out of beds, struggling to find a meaningful relationship, Robbie seems to be the most settled he’s ever been with girlfriend Ayda Field. The 28-year-old American actress, who starred in the More 4 series Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, supported the star when he went into rehab last year to battle an addiction to prescription drugs. Friends of the former Take That star say that Ayda is the reason he’s put on weight – because he’s so relaxed! “Robbie has made it clear he’s put his showbiz life on hold,” a mate said. “He doesn’t need to remain trim for any professional reason, so he’s let himself go. He’s really happy with Ayda and being content can lead to weight gain.” Football success Robbie has always loved his football, but after moving to Los Angeles fulltime five years ago, he immersed himself in the game more than ever before. In 2005, Rob bought a pitch and formed a team with ex-pats and fellow celebs, which he named LA Vale. He spent over a year developing and managing the team, and they soon found themselves at the top of the LA Premier League. But just when it looked like Rob would soon be swapping post-match shirts with his mate David Beckham in the big leagues, the team disbanded over an argument about money. The truth is out there Robbie’s new passion, or some would say obsession, is UFOs and alien abductions. He’s travelled across America to UFO conventions, spoken with abductees and scientists, and he owns hundreds of books and DVDs on the subject. And now, according to reports, he is considering spending £2.5 million on an observatory of his own in the desert outside Los Angeles. Rob went public about his new interest when he teamed up with journalist Jon Ronson to make a Radio 4 documentary on their experiences at a UFO convention. In Journey to the Other Side, the pair travel to Nevada to hear testimonies of alien abductions and perhaps witness a paranormal event or two. Robbie also revealed that he’s seen UFOs a few times himself – once as a child, then again while lying on a sun-lounger in LA, and more recently while listening to a song he’s written about alien contact, called Arizona. “A big ball of gold light turned up,” he said. “We thought it was Venus or Mars, but when the track stops playing, it disappears. When Arizona was turned back on again, the ball came back and it happened four times.” During a recent radio interview alongside Joss Stone, Robbie also admitted he sometimes contemplates quitting music altogether and make a career out of his new obsession. “Seriously, I want to go out and investigate UFOs. I’m stopping being a pop star; I want to be a fulltime ufologist.” Nice to hear you’re enjoying yourself, Robbie. But, like your mate ET, maybe you could phone home now and again? We miss you back here in Blighty! Should Robbie stay in LA and while away his days watching for UFOs, or move back to Britain and relaunch his music career?_________________